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tv   The Willis Report  FOX Business  May 7, 2013 9:00pm-10:01pm EDT

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to the markets, the benghazi testimony taking up something that fix sated the financial community as well. how big does it get and how much disrupt what we've got? tomorrow. see you then. ♪ gerri: hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. tonight on "the willis report" this gaining new report on safety in e skies. unbelievable shortcomings in airplane maintenance. the dow blows through 15,000, and the market hits another record. how tough fix some simple mistakes that all investors make. also, what is the real cost of immigration reform for the consumerin the overall economy? we are on the case tonight on "the willis report." ♪ gerri: we begin tonight with a
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milestone on wall street and another great day for your retirement. the dow jones industrial average a zipping past 15,000. take a look at those numbers, closing above that level for the first time ever. the index closed up 87 points while the s&p 500 hit its fourth record in a row. ur money is making money. the good news. the bad news, if you set out this rally stocks are getting more and more expensive, now trading at 19 times earnings. stocks are only a part of your wealth. most of those also rely on realistic to build our net worth. good news for you, if you were looking for an opportunity to buy. banks are slightly loosening those purse strings fally, actually lending money again. americans are discovering it is easier to get every fight, rtgage, all kinds of loans. banks are finally doing what they should be doing, which is lending people money, especially
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people with good credit and that is great news. how can youake advantage of all of this? let' bring in group kessler, vice president. great to have you wanna show. i am hearing about all kinds of things. zero down loans, piggybacked loans. it is beginning to sound a lot like 2006 all over again. our banks loosening up? >> is selig 2006 with a huge differce, now you need to verify your income, your assets command be credit worthy. that is the big difference. the end of the day you consign the bottom liline in you have those. gerri: a lot of people feel like, you know, banks have not done enough. of course, now we are seeing is the refinances leading the market. some 6percent of people getting new loans are finances. what do you make of that? >>he big thing is anyone who physically can refinance is taking advantage of what they're able to. what we are seeing is the wave of the refinances continuing because the government is releasing new programs on a pretty regular basis that are
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enabling more and more to be able to refinance. gerri: some of this is led by the government. because, as you were saying before we came to air, there is no market for selling jbo loans quite yet. >> mostly everything ties to the government because the government is buying everything, whether it be fannie mae or freddie mac or an fha mortgage. it is ultimately backed by the government which is what programs are mostly available. gerri: the average credit score, 745. that is pretty good. if i saw 600 would think that is loose. this is a high credit score. >> a little misleading. what you are seeing is predominantly again among the people are refinancing, and those who are have higher credit scores. those who have lower are either timid and don't think that they can or more often than not and there and a situation where they were for ) a short sale of bankptcy and would not be able to apply. so the credit score the you're seeing is a low skewed.
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gerri: 745 sounds good toe. i will talk about what you shou shop around because in the last boom, that was the word to be ok around, compared deals, get the best deal. you say that does not make sense >> what makes sense is feeling comfortable with your lender. that, to me, is the biggest thing to recall 50 different. gerri: i will tell you what makes me feel comfortable is good terms. at one a friend. i want someone to give me alone. >> but you want someone to explain the process. it is a cumbersome process that you might only go through a couple of times you lifetime but the temple understanding of. gerri: what is so interesting, as i understand is, quickoans is the number three lender in the country which is shocking. what does that tell you? >> they're paying attention to customer service. ishe expnation behind it. if you were to go back to 2006-7, the sues we face of those that were not explained. now the product that we have our little more tame and are not these crazy things that you can kind of get in trouble with.
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now it is more york conventional 30-year fixed product, but people still need explanation. b explaining it. gerri: if these online banks really get a foothold, regular brick and mortar banks will say, there's a lot of competition. we will go for it. >> there is a market, but quicken is selling the se product. it is just more of these potentially that someone can go online to make a phone : get. gerri: they will give you any link loan you want to read you 17 years, five years, 19 years. >> traditional bri and mortar can provide the same financing in most cases. gerri: did not advertise it. >> that as a whole different story. gerri: i want to make one point here. the 30-year fixed mortgage rate, three and a half. fifteen year, 273. at this opportunity. that is historic low. if we look at our future that is
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coming to was, you will never see rates as low as you are right now. that is something we will always be talking about. gerri: you will never see rates as low as you see right now. i love to hear that. thank you for coming on. >> thank you for having me. gerri: a programming note. coming up, fox business will spend the entire day on the businessf real estate. whether you're buying, selling, are investing, we have you covered. now, while real-estate is oking up, safety in the air is not. according to a new report, ocking, the faa is doing a poor job overseeing the repair and maintenance of our nation's jet liners. a new report from the inspector general for the apartment of transportation shows what repair errors, lots of them. lack of training, lax oversight. with more on ts,or managing director of the national transportation safety board. thank you for coming on. were you surprised? >> not really. it was a tough report, but we do
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have a very safe system, andwe go the fa and the carriers and manufacturers for the system. this report really highlighted some shorts -- shortcomings in a very complex system. gerri: you know, i have to tell you, i was amazed by this report. i felt like we are being duped into thinking that the system is safe and yet there are big problems. most of this oversight to most of this repair and maintenance is outsourced by the major airlines. oversight is even more important. here is what the report said. in part, it picked up 119 randomly selected work force, 92 of them and errors. and this is another ." but to me, have to tell you, that is a pretty damning hit rates. >> it is a high rate, and the ig was correct in pointing it out. but let's look at this. you mentioned outsourcing. you're right.
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most of the major airlines now are outsourcing part, if not all of their maintenance. that means they have to be supervising those guys as wel as the faa has to be a resident. but in a heavy maintenance operation what they call us the check or a deep check, there can be thousands of work orders. many of the issues that were raised by the ig were really paperwork issues. that question is,s the fa looking at to the risk factors that could cause a catastrophic failure? that is where the concern is. the focus should be o the repairs and maintenance being done to the safety of flight issues. i mean - gerri: that is my question ever that is my question. are we safe? this is a damning report wit -- let me tell you, the wording in it, i raised my eyebrows. shocking. the you think we are sick of there? are they ignoring things that
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could ultimately lead to a jet liner going down? >> i think we're safe. i think the system really has some many levels of checks and double checks. but this is a wake- call. you know, the faa is bound up against sequestered. inspectors don't hav the travel budgets that they used to have. training has been cut. and, you know, at some point we in washington are going to have to figure out what is really important and how we fund it and safety has got to be at the top of that agenda. gerri: peter, i was encouraged all by the statements in the report that said some of these folks were riding dow the things i were wrong with these airlines on aiece of paper, not a checklist, not something that was printed out. this was not on to a laptop or a federal form. hand scratched. is that any way to run repairing minutes of the nation's jet liners? no, it isn't. some of tse men as operations, you know, they really need more
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close supervision. we have to give the faa the horses t do it. gerri: all right. thank you for coming on. appreciate your coming o the show. great conversation. >> thank you. gerri: now we want to know what you think. here is our question. is the government playing fast and loose with your airsick the? log onto gerriwillis.com. vote on the right-hand side of the screen and i will share the resus of the end of the show. we have mor to come. just getting started. a busy day, including more on the record-setting day on wall street. now that your retirement is soaring, it is starts the day closer attention to all of those hidden fees and we will tell you how to do that. next, consumer website and banks struggle to stop denial of service attacks. it will give you the latest on that. stay with u ♪ this is $100,000.
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gerri: and new wave of hack attack threat starting the u.s. government and your money today. as part of what they were calling operion usa strike, anonymous-lange attackers are trending to what you off the cyber map. unbelievable. with the latest and joined by digital forensics analysts and diplomats. welcome back to the show. but have you here. you know, big promises, big threats. here is what they told us. lets rip them where it hurts the most. we are anonymous. we do not forget. we do not forget. expect us. we are the final boss of the internet, and there are about five or six spelling errors in that. don't even count the grammar. nothing happened. so should we just go back to sleep? >> well, it w not a widespread attack like was promised. they have to keep in mind that anonymous is a loosely formed group. so who knows who wrote those. some of them are repeats of others. and this attack, it is hard to
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attribute to any one person or group. that is the nature of anonymous. they did do some attacks today. they released a dabase of over 10,000 user names and passwords from the e-commerce site, credit card numbers and other information. the honolulu police department had a breach. so it is not that they did nothing. they did not do anything that was huge today. gerri: they were promising to attack t white house. the defense department, the fbi. they were promising to -- >> those of the ones we need to worry about. those of the ones that are sucking money at a bank accounts. gerri: can you heare? >> yes,. gerri: just checking. wasn't sure. they're promising to hit the white house, the defense department, the fbi. it did not happen. i think a lot of people out there wondering, what can i do to protect myself? >> well -- so -- in terms of banking their is a difference between an online bank and
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online banking. when you're doing online banking your on your computer, your tablet, your company network. that is the network that needs to be protected. using a normal everyday computer with anti virus and firewall, that is not going to protect your online banking sessi. gerri: that is not enough? that is all anybody ever does. what else to have to do? >> well, if you are going to do -- if you're going to check your balance and make a transfer you need to have a dedicated hard and machine network because the attacks that are going on against -- to steal those credentials are so sophisticated that ant virus and firewalls, they go right through them. gerri: the ipad, the smart phone, forget about it. the department of defence has just said that the pentagon accusing the chinese government of cyber espionage, hacking into our systems, for the first time
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they actually pointed the finger at the chinese government and the military. what do you make of that? >> well, in the security forensics community we have known aut this for a long time. these foreign national entities, either agents of the government or working dependent and share the information with other actors that talk with the government's overseas. they are in our networks persistently. there are stealing intellectual property, stealing designs and marketing pns, pricing information, future projects, a trade show plans. and what they're going for is to steal our jobs, to steal the technology and steelers jobs. gerri: a new kind of warfare. thank you for coming on. a pleasure chatting with you. thk you all right. later in the show, some startling new numbers on a cost of immigration. a debate. next, we answer the question, how do you do that? tips on avoiding all of those retirement fees.
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♪ gerri: well, retirement, of blear retirement is growing with the bull market. th bigger nest eggs also mean bigger fees. is important to cut down on the same costs, but how you do that? joining me now, ceo of the online retirement. welcome back to the show. you know what is amazing to me, nobody thinks they pay fees. nobody.
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like 71 percent of people think their retirement is free. they're misled. >> well, the ultimate free lunch. this missed -- it's misleading because these fees come out of the top of your investment return, so when you are looking in your statement and seeing a return of 10%, that is the net of fees to be said that is going to return of 11 and 12, but the weight is structured, they'll have to tell you. is basically your is your return and we took our part. thanks. gerri: it's already gone and we never told you about it. he is for the mutual funds, but also for maintenance of the retirement. a lot of people have their hand out. >> at least five different hands in the pine. gerri: five? >> there could be. you have the mutual-fund investment expenses. in there or in addition to you have things called 12b1 fees. marketing costs. seventy-eight, sub transfer agency fees. fees that the mutual funds pay companies like mine to help record keep. then you have what in the
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insurance company plans you have any fees which are called mortality administrative expenses. gerri: what is that? >> i won't en go into it. we don't have time. gerri: short story, you're paying a lot. here is my question. can i as an individual negotiate these down or can i reduce them in any way? >> no. you cannot. however, you can go to your age our department or business owner will we encourage you to do is definitely pay attention, shop around, do your homework, look at the eenses you are paying. bring this to the attention of the h.r. department produced in the upper yourself because this is your money. these are your dollars. and they are on -- you are hiring these people to work for you. you want to make sure th higher the right people at the right price. gerri: also possible to make smart choices within your own plan instead of picking a very expensive actively managed fund. how much money do you thinkver my lifetime i am missing out on because of these fees?
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>> i have seen different studies that can call it up to $150,000. these do add up tens of thousands of dollars over someone's lifetime. you aware to yourself to absolutely make sure the you're getting the right balance. it's not about cheap. getting the best value for what you're paying. and it is a pretty competitive marketplace, so you need to look around. gerri: typical fees can be half a percent, to%, paying a lot of money. tell your boss, the people who run your 401k, thank you for coming on. unbelievable numbers. well, now it is time to look at the stori you're clicking on tonight. americans cutting back on their credit cards. rising jus about a billion dollars. that is the smallest increase in eight months, another sign that consumers are reluctant to take on debt. walmart is starting secession
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talks. reports today at the retail giant may name a successor the 63 year-old is not expected to step down immediately. a federal appeals court has struck down the national labor relations board rule requiring businesses to the put up posters informing workers of the right to form a union steading the board went too far. and lay's potato chips are getting cheesier. the flavor of feed asks chicken and waffles and suraya. i have some in my refrigerator. those are some of the house stories right now on foxbusiness.com. check amount. coming up, a warning about over sharing on social media. next, $6 trillion. that is how much one group says immigration reform is going to cost taxpayers. it will talk about those numbers coming after the break. ♪
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former fox business studios, here again is gerri willis. gerri: debate number this week was 15,000 and markets. the other big number was estimated cost of the immigration reform plan, made its way through congress. not everybody agrees with that. with us now is a vice president of the heritage foundation that came up with the numbers. and cato institute policy analysis. derek, you say the cost of immigration will be $6.3 trillion. how did you come up with those
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numbers? >> let me to quickly why we decided this was important. the size and scope of government is much bigger than heritage or cato would like. we have gone from a government in 1935 it's been 3% of its money on transfer payment, but it's taking from americans and giving it to others, now we have a government that spends two thirds of the money to do that. gerri: we talk about all the time on this neork. let's get to immigration and the cost. the immigration numbers are controversial and interesting. >> we calculated the cost by looking up 11.5 million unlawful imgrants in the country and looking through their lifetime how much are they going to pay taxes and how much will be receiving government services and benefits. that's how we ca up with the 6.3 to trillion dollar number. gerri: we have to do a lot of extrapolating. we have to make assumptions about wh happens to people over time. >> yes, absolutely one of the things that makes the most out of this is this report
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is nearly 100 pages. it goes through in great detail how we went to those numbers, including lottery ticket purchases as an example. gerri: alex, you don't agree. you think these numbers are wrong. >> we agree with heritage that the size and scope of government isnormous. that the way to do that is to wall ourselves from the benefits of immigration. the heritage study, unfortunately, it comes up with an incorrect number, in a massively undercounts immigration going forward. we know whatmmigration does. it adds back to the production of gdp, and makes it bigger, and makes tax revenues bigger over the long run. we need a dynamic model to store this going forward and unfortunately, this heritage study is very different from the other research is excellent, but it does not include a dynamic model like that. gerri: derek, what is your
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response. >> alex is looking at the report. we think it's unfair and it cost too costs too much. and it will lead to further problems in the future as amnesty may happen in the future. >> this uses academic research we can expect a 15% increase in the way that these individuals can work in the legal market. we are working with those that have different skills. including those that have different skills, we work together to compete against each
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other. this is sort of the process that we have to american history that the process that we will see -- gerri: i don't want to debate immigratn. but we don't debate that issue. but there is responsively need to very specific point made by alex maybe we are miscounting how much these people are going to earn. >>ur study increases wages immediately following this. but i would challenge alex that undoubtedly there are places in immigration we can make changes that will benefit the economy. these people are already part of the labor force here in any small increase in the wages would affect gdp. most of the benefits woul go to the unlawful immigrants themselves. it would make americans -- nativeborn and immigrants better off. >> coming ck to the two points, its lowest possible
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estimation for the wage. the real number that people are coming to is about three times greater. also, undercounting the ability that these people want to change jobs easier, work with industriesincreases to fit better into our society to be able to increase their earnings. they have an incredibly static and how well immigrants will do in the future. the american dream is dead and that's just not true. gerri: thank you both for coming on tonight. i know that people are watching those numbers very carefully. thank you so much. >> last night in the choctaw, lou dobbs also pointed out that there is serious opposition. >> the ypical imigrant household from sec.
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$1000 a year. and more and government benefits. jumping to 30,000 dollars, if the gang of a plan becomes a law. more than doubling it. heritage is a force to be reckoned with. the last time congress debated this, eritage produced a report in the nonsense finding that amnesty would cost taxpayers at least $2.6 trillion. gerri: lou dobbs joins me now. cost does matter, doesn't it? >> this is a discussion within the congress and senate and this president. there is absolutely no talk about the cost of legislation,
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it results in a net result of $16.3 trillion. we had bee talking about illegal immigration throughout the last several decades. the fact is that it is called an externality, rather than being paid by the unlawful employers of these folks, whatever the number is the one to assign to the number of illegal immigrants in the country. that is being paid for, welfare services, medical, education. not by the employe. but by the rest of us who have not had a vot of the thing. if the president had his way, we wouldn't have a vote this time either. but it looks like we are going to see some substantial opposition.
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he is all jammed up now on immigration. separating the conservatives see that that is true. >> woody talking about tonight? >> we are talking about rhetoric and the truth. guns and gun laws. according to the brady campaign. california is the state with the toughest gun laws in the country. utah is the state with the least. and yet we will be showing you something that the president would prefer that you no see. and that is the argument that he has put together to control guns and rollback the second amendment. california, the number one state with the most murders by handguns and utah is the u.s. i just can't understand. >> we cannot wait for your show to start. good to see you, sir. and when we come back, chris christie taking drastic action
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to lose weight. a surgery that would best way to go? and age where everyone thinks they know everything about you, there is the risk of over sharing a warning coming up next. you hurt my feelings, todd. i did? when visa signature asked everybody what upgraded experiences really mattered... you suggested luxury car service instd of "strength training with patrick willis." come on todd! flap them chicken wings. [ grunts ] well, i travea lot and umm... [ male announcer ] visa signature, every gradedxperience comes from listening to our cardholders. visa signature. your idea of what a card should be.
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gerri: making private details public. over sharing personal information th anyone. here as elizabeth bernstein. so why do people do this?
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it's called self-regulation we want to make a good impression. we are trying to be witty and smart. that takes up a lot of brain power. gerri: you say certain people are more likely to do this and others. like to? >> some people are more likely. i talk to people today. certainly, womenalk a lot. it can be men or women, people who care a lot about relationships, they want to be close, but they are constantly monitoring how they're doing in a relationship. so they get nervous and they tend to over share. gerri: they talk in a black. social media makes this worse. you can just sit down with your pc or your ipad and blab away. >> y, and when we are behind a computer screen, we don't think that we are actually
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broadcasting. social media indicates that nothingshould be private anymore. >> it's not obvious for a lot of people. recognize situations like this. >> you want to thank before you open your mouth. am i going to meet with my boss, she always makes me nervous, they get it through beforehand. that is a big issue. >> it's always the people that you don't want to talk to you that makes it bizarre. this is going to make us more
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anxious than the nee to clam up. >> i would think a lot of people will relieve anxiety by doing this. is that the case? >> well, they arenot. if you think about it, you know that y're going to feel worse, you're going to feel like an idiot. so that is a big deal. if you're like me, you want to go back and pologize. you want to say okay, don't do it, it will have negative effect gerri: there are negative effects? >> yes, that's another way to keep yourself from doing it. they it through and you really will realize that it won't make you feel better or closer. >> in my article, three times in one week, people said to me, i
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want to tell you something that i've never told anybody, not my spouse and therapists, and i thought oh, no. i've been trying to deal with it. if you like what you need to do is smile, but find a way to say, look, i am time crunch. you want to find the right way shut it off. >> it's 81 degrees in miami. it looks fantastic. i'm not annoyed over share. i promise. i'm done with it. [laughter] gerri: one of the most blogged about companies has made it into the fortune 500. who is it? facebook. 482 out of 500. they have revenue around $500, pretty shocking for a company that gets so much attention. in tonight's top five, berkshire
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hathaway. or nearly $100 billion in sales. number four with chevron. this oil giant reporting its second highest earnings in the company was three and number two is exxon mobil. the biggest company in the world had its second highest annual profit in 2012 and net income jumped more than 9%. the number one company in the fortune 500 is wal-mart. the retail giant is back on top after sinking to number two last year. sales for the companare up 6% to $444 billion. so where is apple on this? it comes in at number six, up from last year silicon, my "two cents more" on hypocrisy and new jersey
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governor cris christie. advice for you coming up next. are you still sleeping? just wanted to check and make sure that we were on schedule. the first technology of its kind... mom and dad, i have great news. is now providing answers families need. siemens. answers.
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or will gerri: chris christie is a
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political heavyweight. you know that, but today, the popular governor is revealing that he underwent weight-loss surgery back in february and apparently lost 40 pounds. here to weigh in is our mdical weight loss weight-loss doctor who has treated hundreds of lab and patience. okay, so tell us what the surgery is and how it works. well, the lap band procedure is only one of three very popular weight-loss surgeries. with the lap band, they put a banner on the top of your stomach. by doing that, they shrink the top of your stomach to the size of an orange one egg. so that really limits the amount of food you can absorb. gerri: there other things you can do like a gastric bypass surgery. how is that different? >> it is much more invasive. there are many more complications, and less people regain the weight after the surgery. there is definitely cutting
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involved. you are disturbing the integrity of the diet. gerri: i feel a bit disturbed already. [laughter] what makes a person a good candidate? >> i tell my patients that you really need to bevery obese, like morbidly obese. gerri: what does that mean? >> at least 100 pounds over your ideal weight. also, you should have tried a strong medical weight-loss program so that your diet is supervised, if your appetite is being controlled, your metabolism is checke and you undergo psychological counseling to determine why you are overheating if that is the problem. gerri: what are the confrontations? >> it is slippage of the band or erosion. the very few people die in operating room. there are more deaths, but i will say that there are surgical complications. suicide is very high in this group of people.
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gerri: that is very disturbing. you're saying that it can be difficult to lose weight and in part because of the choices people make when they sit down at the table after that? >> that is so true. with the lap band, you cannot eat a lot of healthy food. because you have this little tiny pouch. so it's hard for you to have a big salad or a lot of vegetables or fruit with a lot of fiber. gerri: it doesn't fit. >> that's right. so what you want todo is have a lot of pudding, a lot of alcohol, have a lot of soft and smooth food thatre highly caloric. gerri: cdnow weight back. that's very difficult. $18,000 to $35,000. you mentioned that some of these people actually commit suicide. is it that in the group of the lap band surgery or those in the morbidly obese generally? >> i think it's in the morbidly obese category generally. but the problein the lap band
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is that many are getting this procedurdone as a quick fix and those people in particular do not do well. in my practice i have seen people lose 20 or 30 pounds and then gain it back. it's beyond what is your advice? is there a better solution than surgery? >> i am always looking for that. you have to realize that the body is a complicated thing. so we have to get somebody back on track metabolically and we have to motivate them. why make sure that they don't have hypothyroidism. i really believe in giving people nutrition on an indivial basis. apatite suppressants are important long-term. during that time, when people are not as hungry, they can adopt new things. people that have the wrong types of bacteria in eir gut are more likely to be obese. but the reason why those
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patients are able to keep awfully longer than the other people is that they have an overgrowth of good bacteria in their gut. that could really be what's causing this long-term weight-loss. gerri: i want you to come back and talk about the bacteria issue. it sounds very interesting. thank you for being on the show. thank you for being on the show. we really appreciate it.the oce. the peruviannchovy harvest suffers. it raises the price of fishmeal, cattle feed and beef. bny mellon turns insights like these into powerful investment strategies. for a university endowment. it funds a marine biologist... who studies the peruvian anchovy. invested in the world. bny mellon.
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some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder -- isn't th a conflict? search "proprietary mutual funds."
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kes! then go to e-trade. we've got over 8,000 mutual funds, and not one of them s our name on it. we're in the business of finding the right investments for you. e-trade. less for us. more for you. the fund's prospectus contains its investment objectives, sks, charges, expenses, and other important information and should be read and considered carefully before investing. for a current prospectus, visit etrade.com/mutualfunds. gerri: a government watchdog says the faa's oversightf hundreds of repair station servicing jet airliners is ineffective. the report says the faa is not targeting stations most likely to present safety risks and they are outsourcing most of the work overseas. is the government playing fast and loose with your safety? bill says they do that with everything in the ivory have problems in this country. robert agrees. the government is too big to be able to efficiently run anything. if something bad happens, they will point the blame away from them or regulate it to deah.
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i agree with you, robert. we also asked the question on gerriwillis.com. 92% said yes, 8% said no. finally tonight, nevermind. the suppressor was that happened back on march 1. the food and drug administration warned that the foodafety would be compromised. and forced to furlough inspectors and who knows what americans would end up eating. well, like iaid, now they are the washington examiner is reporting that the cuts will be made for other expenses like travel and training. grted, i am no expert on budgets, but this is what i have been saying for months. i am not alone. there are plenty of ways to cut instead of jumping to furlough's and layoffs. if you can't find any waste and fraud and abuse, you're not looking close enough in government. that is mytwo cents more". this month marks 10 years since the gender barrier was poor
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then. i amjoined by a new guest tomorrow. that's it for tonight's "willis report." thank you for joining us. you can't catch us la great night and we will see tomorrow. lou: good evening, eeryone, thanyou for bein with us. a record-breaking day on wall street. the dow jones industrial closing above 15,000 for the first time ev. the dow jones and s&p closing at record highs, and the small stock index, the dow hit 87-point on the day it closed at 15,056. the record for the dow jones is here. the s&p is up nearly nine points, closing at 1625.96. another record for the broader index.

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